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Posts Tagged ‘Calculator’

YIMBY: Low-Income Housing

November 25, 2016 | 2:02 pm | trulialogo | Infographics |

lowincomevvaluetrulianyt

The YIMBY (Yes-In-My-Backyard) movement is fairly new.

In the United States, early leaders of the YIMBY movement include Sonja Trauss in San Francisco and Nikolai Fedak in New York. The first ever Yes In My Backyard conference was held in Boulder, Colorado, in June 2016.

Nikolai has done an amazing job at chronicling the explosion of new development in NYC over the past several years with his must read web site New York YIMBY.

One of the misconceptions with the NIMBY movement which is largely the opposite of YIMBY is the idea/rule of thumb that low-income housing always drags down property values of nearby properties. In an era challenged by the lack of any type of affordable housing, this makes a bad situation worse.

According to this recent research by Trulia (FYI – I was part of their industry advisory board from 2006-2014), and notably in aggregate form, the impact seems to be non-existent in the majority of the markets covered. One can’t conclude there is no impact as a general rule but it does show that should not be the default assumption.

The above infographic is from this Weekend’s New York Times’ real estate section column called ‘Calculator’ – Low-Income Housing: Why Not in My Neighborhood?. The methodology used in the Trulia research was the following:

To measure this, Trulia compared the median price per square foot of nearby homes (within 2,000 feet of low-income housing) with that of homes farther away (2,001 to 4,000 feet) over 20 years, starting 10 years before the low-income housing was built and ending 10 years after.

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NYT Calculator: Suburban Sales Boom Measured By Houses on Monopoly Board

November 19, 2016 | 7:46 am | nytlogo | Charts |

The New York Times created another super cool graphic in their new Calculator column, based on my idea. In the fall of 2015 I observed a massive surge of sales in Westchester County (north of NYC for those not familiar with our area). However median sales price was nearly flat during this period. This was phenomenon repeated in all of the counties that surround NYC – except for NJ since I don’t cover that market yet but anecdotally I believe the same phenomenon is occurring there. I believe this moment was the point where the affordability challenge became so severe that renters and move up buyers had to move out of the city.

Specifically, Brooklyn showed a surge in median sales price from 2009 with a modest growth in sales. Westchester reflected the opposite patterns of Brooklyn. Westchester county sales boomed over the same period while the growth in median sales price was much more tepid.

westchestervbrooklyn11-2016

Below is the NYT graphic for the suburban sales boom article.

11-18-16nytcalculator

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[Leverage] Calculating Your Home Investment Return Realistically

March 16, 2014 | 9:00 am | Infographics |

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[click to expand]

I think many, if not most people calculate the return on their home as an investment as this CNN/Money calculator does. After seeing this, I whipped up a theoretical infographic illustrating how the use of leverage in a home purchase factors in to your return. It’s super simplistic, not factoring in opportunity cost, use and enjoyment, tax deductions, improvements and other factors because I wanted to show the power of leverage.

Forget about price indices like Case Shiller or similar. I can’t tell you how many times I have seen a home price index paired up against a stock price index as a way to determine which investment is better. Apples and oranges.

Measure your ROI using what you invested (down payment) and what your home equity expanded (or contracted) to.

The CNN/Money rate of return calculator is really only a measurement of home price appreciation compared to the same period for stocks and bonds as an opportunity cost – comparing different asset types side by side – yet that’s not how the majority of homebuyers interact with their home as an investment.

It’s most often about leverage.

UPDATE
An appraisal colleague and friend of mine pointed out that in my original version, I incorrectly used the word “profit” within the infographic rather than what I was actually talking about: “equity” ie return on investment (ROI) – how much the original down payment gained over time. The numbers all remained unchanged.

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