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Tight Credit Is Causing Housing Prices to Rise

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I’ll repeat that: Tight Credit Is Causing Housing Prices to Rise.

Yes I know. I’ll explain.

This week the Federal Reserve released it’s January 2013 Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices [2] and it continued to show little movement in mortgage underwriting standards but demand was up. The increase in demand has not softened mortgage lending standards. In fact, mortgage standards have remained essentially unchanged since Lehman collapsed in 2008.

On the household side, domestic banks reported that standards for both prime and nontraditional mortgages were essentially unchanged over the past three months. Respondents indicated that demand for prime residential mortgages increased, on net, while demand for nontraditional residential mortgages was unchanged.

Tight lending standards has prevented many sellers from listing their homes [3] because they don’t qualify for the trade up, holding supply off the market. The shortage is manifesting itself by also keeping people unaffected by tight credit from listing until they find a home they wish to purchase. Record low mortgage rates keep the demand pressure on as affordability is at record highs. Rising prices are not really based on anything fundamental like employment and a robust economy.

Tight credit + record low mortgage rates => reduced supply + steady demand => rising prices.

Like I said before…

Tight Credit Is Causing Housing Prices to Rise.

I’ll repeat that….

Tight Credit Is Causing Housing Prices to Rise.



January 2013 Senior Loan Officer Opinion Survey on Bank Lending Practices [Federal Reserve [1]]
Falling Inventory Has Created a Housing “Pre-Covery,” not “Recovery” [Miller Samuel Matrix [3]]