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Lifestyles of the Rich and Fictitious

When the television series 666 Park Avenue debuts this Sunday, it will mark the latest example in a long tradition of writers and directors setting fictional lives in actual New York City real estate. Be it the Ansonia at 2109 Broadway, the real-life address associated with 666 Park Avenue, or 185 East 85th Street, the home of George and Louise Jefferson, the Big Apple is rife with real estate made famous through television shows. With that in mind, The Commercial Observer reached out to Jonathan Miller, president and chief executive of Miller Samuel, for his thoughts on value using what limited information was available back in the day of Manhattan’s most recognizable television co-ops, hangouts and offices spaces. And while the numbers may be surprising, what we still haven’t figured out after all these years is how Joey Tribbiani was able to rent all that prime West Village space on a struggling actor’s salary.

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