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Posts Tagged ‘Getting Graphic’

[Getting Graphic] Where Housing Is Affordable And Where It Ain’t

April 3, 2006 | 12:01 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related images(s).

Businessweek estimated affordability using the National Association of Home Builders Opportunity Index compared with the family median income in that metro area.

Affordable… Click here for full graphic [BW]

Source: BW


Not… Click here for full graphic [BW]

Source: BW


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[Getting Graphic] A Lot Of Millionaires Despite Excluding Primary Residences

March 29, 2006 | 12:02 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite real estate-related images(s).

If we included primary residences, I would bet that 25% of home owners would qualify. It kind of surprised me that the most expensive housing market in the United States, Manhattan, only ranked 13th, but perhaps that can be explained by the debt service required to buy an apartment.

Click here for full graphic [NYT] and the original article

Source: NYT


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[Getting Graphic] Investors Take A Seat

March 28, 2006 | 1:48 pm |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite real estate-related images(s).

This photo was taken this past Sunday in Northern Virginia. Its a collection of lockboxes for investor units being flipped in a condo development. The balloons on specific lockboxes must be part of a well thought out marketing strategy.

Go to Bubble Meter to get the whole story.


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[Getting Graphic] A Bear Market For Housing

March 20, 2006 | 12:44 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related chart(s).

Here’s a great summary of the state of the housing market, and its interaction with the consumer.

Bear markets begin when growth in real consumer spending peaks and beings to slow. I think I made the case above that consumer spending is going to face a real uphill battle as cash-out financing slows down, higher energy costs don’t go away, higher interest rates translate into higher mortgage and credit card payments on top of legislation requiring higher minimum payments on credit card balances.

Slower consumer spending and recessions happen “on the margin.” By that I mean that consumer spending does not stop. It just slows down and maybe even stops growing on a year over year basis. That pushes profits down, which means company after company starts having earnings misses and stocks start to drop.

Click here for full article [Goldseek].









Source: Goldseek


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[Getting Graphic] Speculators Moving To Greener Pastures

March 20, 2006 | 12:01 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related chart(s).

Click here for full graphic [latimes.com] and the associated article : Housing Speculators Relocate to Hotter Spots [LA Times]

Too much speculative activity from investors hoping to turn a quick profit is perhaps the biggest sign that a market — whether real estate or stocks or any other asset — is in an overpriced “bubble” condition, economists say. Too many speculators drive prices too high, and when they sense that the market is topping, they tend to sell all at once, sending prices into a free fall.

Source: latimes.com


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[Getting Graphic] Record Increases In Real Home Prices

March 6, 2006 | 12:01 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related chart(s).

Click here for full graphic [NYT] and the full article Floyd Norris: By Most Measures, a Housing Boom for the Ages[NYT]

Source: NYT


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[Getting Graphic] Housing Prices Boom & Bust Cycle

March 1, 2006 | 10:02 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related chart(s).

Source: NYT

Click here for full graphic [NYT]

For the associated article: Don’t fear the bubble that bursts: [NYT]


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[Getting Graphic] Genius On A Napkin: Housing Boom Phase Diagrams

February 27, 2006 | 12:05 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related graphic(s).

Click here for full post [Rutledge Blog]

Enlarge graphic

Source: Rutledge Blog


Although I consider myself geek-like, the chart Dr. Rutledge provides is a bit over my head but his explanation is clear. (make a mental note – consider changing this post to [Getting Text])

Dr. Rutledge’s post was written in the spring of 2005 and the comments he makes are very relevant today.

A drop in interest rates will make a permanent increase in housing prices but, over time, the growing housing stock will mitigate some of the price and construction pressure, which means the initial burst of activity, and possibly of price, are likely to moderate somewhat over time. To an information theorist, the initial spike in price is a way of amplifying the initial information signal that housing is now scarce in order to get everybody’s attention so they get out their hammers and build more houses.

So interest-rate induced housing inflation is largely a one-time event. It is not property inflation. It is not a housing bubble.

Housing inflation, as opposed to one-time increases in home prices, happens when there is a continuous increase in demand caused, for example, by systematically inflationary monetary policy. We do not have that today.

Housing bubbles pop when a sudden reversal of interest rates, or a sudden reduction in the availability of mortgage financing, causes a sudden, one-time, drop in demand. I don’t think that is going to happen either. Inflation today is likely to remain low for some time.


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[Getting Graphic] Housing In The Circle Of Economics

February 27, 2006 | 12:03 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related chart(s). This week we have a two for one…

In this post from last summer The US Trade Deficit is Unsustainable [Axis of Logic] Bud Conrad shows how dependent the US housing market and US government deficit spending is on re-investment by foreigners. This is consistent with the negative savings rate. Americans are spending more than they make but this activity is expected to reverse as the housing market eases as consumers reign in spending and begin saving.

The following charts show the role of housing in the economic cycle.

A basic view of the economy as show by Axis of Logic: _Households earn the wages they spend on the goods and services from businesses._

Source: Axis of Logic



The next chart adds that _consumers spend a portion purchasing foreign goods. The foreigners then recycle the dollars they collect from this trade into the US government debt by buying Treasuries and into Agency debt of Government Sponsored Enterprises like Fannie Mae, which then provide money for housing._

Source: Axis of Logic



Albeit simplified, these charts help demonstrate that:

Foreigners have funded our housing boom and provided enough credit that the growing federal deficits have not driven interest rates up.


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[Getting Graphic] Bay Area Change In Home Prices

February 21, 2006 | 12:01 am |

Getting Graphic is a semi-sort-of-irregular collection of our favorite BIG real estate-related chart(s).

Click here for full graphic [SFGate.com]

Source: SFGate.com


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