The real estate blogs that are springing up daily have provided the delivery of content in real time, causing many in big media to consider launching their own blogs to keep pace. One of the first Big Media real estate specific blogs was the recent launch of The Walk-through by the New York Times.

The perception by many is that small blogs are independent and a more pure source of news while Big Media is subject to influence from advertising.


Have you looked at the titles of some of real estate blogs lately?

It seems like more than half use the word “bubble” in their title. That seems akin to using “crash” that describes one side of the housing picture. Wait a sec, here is one that uses both of these words. Southern California Real Estate Bubble Crash. Conversely, there are virtually no blogs with titles that say something like “There is no bubble” or “Anti-bubble.” This certainly suggests widespread questions about the real estate market.

The word “bubble” seems to strike an emotional cord with many. Its a very effective way to steer traffic to a blog since the word bubble grabs a lot of eyeballs from Google searches. With all the talent that goes into many of these blogs, I just wonder if this stratgy isn’t too short sighted.

Imagine for a minute that the real estate market does not see the effects of a bubble over the next few years. Such a title will seem strangely out of place. If the market does see the effects of a housing bubble over the next few years, it would still seem like a relatively obsolete title after the bursting of such a bubble.

I don’t mean to get hung up on this point, and it is a relevantly minor point, but since there are so many real estate blogs named “bubble” there must be more to this issue. Here are some of my favorite real estate blogs that have “bubble” in their title.

The Housing Bubble 2
The Boy In The Housing Bubble
Bubble Meter
bubbleinfo.com
SacramentoHousingBubble
Bubble Tracking
Housing Panic – There Goes the Neighborhood (The Bubble Bursts)
Inside The DC Bubble
Northern NJ Real Estate Bubble
The Bursting Bubble
Seattle Bubble

Well, you get the picture

Update: Added Trackback to The Stalwart who is a must read for me.


7 Responses to “The Term “Bubble” In Real Estate Blog Titles Says A Lot”

  1. Our blog doesn’t have to scare about the market going down. We are here to report news of the Houston market itself for real estate investors.

    If interested, you may check us out at HoustonRealNews.com

    And how to become better at it – in Houston anyway.

    We focus on breaking news, for example the City of Houston/FEMA voucher controversy.

    We are the only ones reporting the “Commercial Viability” angle.

  2. David says:

    “I don’t mean to get hung up on this point, and it is a relevantly minor point, but since there are so many real estate blogs named “bubble” there must be more to this issue. “

    As one of the Bubble Bloggers, I truly believe in the bubble. I blog to inform the public and as source of enjoyment. This speculative episode must end.

  3. Randall James says:

    It think the reason that bubble is being used so frequently is that there is still a large debate on what will happen to the real estate market. We all experienced a bubble during the dot com boom, and we just do not have a different language to describe the current situation.

  4. Tim Dunn says:

    Seattlebubble.blogspot.com is now counterbalanced by SeattleBubble? at http://seattlemetrorealestate.blogspot.com/

    I am its moderator, and my goal is to examine the question with civility, calm, and a requirement for citing the sources of assertions which are claimed to be factual. The alarmists make many claims, but rarely cite the sources of their alleged facts, and use dubious methodology, such as making sweeping generalizations based on anecdotal evidence.

  5. Tim Dunn says:

    David above said, ““I don’t mean to get hung up on this point, and it is a relevantly minor point, but since there are so many real estate blogs named “bubble” there must be more to this issue. “

    Yes, that’s what the Y2K alarmists said, too. The real situation is that some few markets are in a bubble, such as Boston and San Diego, but many more are not, such as Seattle.

    You will find a detailed examination of this at: http://seattlemetrorealestate.blogspot.com/ for a detailed study of this.

  6. Chandler says:

    We as well publish a blog about real estate in the Houston area. Being an appraiser performing real estate appraisals I try to stay away from talk about the housing bubble and concentrate more on the inner workings of real estate transactions. The entire process is such a mystery to some many people, even those who have already been through it.

    Check us out or contribute as http://www.cpappraisals.net/blog

  7. We’ve found out that it’s all finding that niche, that hook to seperate yourself from everyone else. Perhaps, those that have used “bubble” in their titles were trying to find a different angle, which ironically has turned into a common angle. It’s hard to stay “up” on what will set you apart.

    At any rate, our blog has attempted to set ourselves apart by appealing locally. Check us out at realtyinsights.blogspot.com for more upcoming information on Indianapolis.